Thursday, January 30, 2014

ASCAP Daily


ASCAP Daily Brief
Wednesday, January 29, 2014


We are pleased to offer you the
ASCAP Daily Brief powered by The Dean's List


This daily email, compiled by ASCAP Board member, music publisher and songwriter Dean Kay, cuts through the media clutter to bring you links to the most relevant news and commentary on the rapidly evolving music industry and how it affects your future livelihood. Now the ASCAP Daily Brief can be accessed on the Headlines page of ASCAP.com and in the ASCAP RSS Feed.


"Copyright theft is theft as in identity, not in car."
Richard Bennett - Visiting Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
Weakening South Africa's IP Regime Would Be Devastating
By Erin Humiston -- IPI's Merrill Matthews makes the case against those who claim that strong intellectual property laws hurt the poor..."Those countries with the strongest IP protections are by far the most prosperous economies. Why? Creators create because their investment and efforts are protected. And those efforts create jobs that grow the economy."
Tarantino Sues Gawker. Hellz Yeah!
By David Newhoff -- There are times when copyright cases contain shades of gray, but this isn't one of them. What possible social justification can anyone offer for leaking the screenplay of a motion picture in development?
Enough Is Enough, Silicon Valley Must End its Elitism and Arrogance
By Vivek Wadhwa -- The public is investing billions of dollars in tech companies and expects professionalism, maturity and corporate social responsibility. It is losing its tolerance for elitism and arrogance.
1999 – The Stories Behind the Songs
By ASCAP100 -- ASCAP stages the first Stories Behind the Songs concert in Washington, DC. The event, featuring music by Marilyn and Alan Bergman, Hal David, Rudy Perez and Jimmy Webb, is intended to raise awareness in the US government about ASCAP's mission by giving a glimpse into the experiences of songwriters hard at work.
Oculus Is Awesome for Games, But It's the Future of Movies
By Angela Watercutter -- "The first time I tried Chris Milk's Beck experience in VR, it fundamentally changed the way I thought about, frankly, audio in VR," says Nate Mitchell, Oculus' vice president of product, "and the impact a live concert could have on me in virtual reality."
Spotify, Rdio, Beats Music, and More: How to Get Started with Subscription Music Services
By Matthew Moskovciak -- This primer fills you in on the good and the bad of subscription music services, and how to choose between all the options out there.
iTunes Radio Ignored in Earnings Call, and Why Apple Doesn't Behave like Pandora
By Brad Hill
Apple Shares Fall on Warning of Revenue Slowdown
By Hayley Tsukayama -- iPhone sales set records during the holidays but missed analysts' forecasts amid flat profits.
Don't Be Surprised If Your TV Soon Seems to Know Everything About Your Politics
By Brian Fung
Why Television Is Dead
By Steven Rosenbaum -- If you want to know where video is going, just take a page out of Deep Throat's handbook in All The President's Men...follow the money.
[Love the new format.]
ICMP Global Briefing - 27 January 2014
By ICMP: International Confederation of Music Publishers
Is This Musician Out Of His Mind...or a Genius?
By Bob Baker -- Musician Matt Farley has written more than 14,000 extremely quirky songs that are available on Spotify and iTunes. He's written and recorded as many as 100 songs in a single day. He makes close to $25,000 in royalties a year. Not from hit songs, but from tiny streams of income from thousands of songs. Is this guy out of his mind...or is he a genius?
Networking: Why it's So Important and How to Do It
By Sari Delmar
Pete Seeger: America's Celebrated Folk Music 'Archive'
By AFP -- A rail-thin New York radical who loved folk music, Pete Seeger loathed the business side and stuck by his principles, influencing younger stars like Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Bruce Springsteen. Seeger died on Monday at the age of 94, leaving behind classics like "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and "If I Had a Hammer," laying out his vision [agree with it or not] of what the United States can and should be.
WATCH: 10-Year-Old With No Arms Plays Trumpet with Only His Feet
By Ralphie Aversa -- The 10-year-old student at Green Street Elementary School in Phillipsburg, NJ, was born without arms. His older sister used to play piano, and that piqued Wallace's musical curiosity. Undeterred by his disability, the fifth-grader learned the trumpet, playing it with his feet.
The Last Place on Earth Without Human Noise
By Rachel Nuwer -- [Let me guess. The Googleplex? But, seriously folks...] Is there anywhere left utterly free of man-made sound?




Dean KayDEAN KAY

Dean Kay has been at the helm of some of the most highly respected and forward thinking music publishing companies in the world, first as COO of the Welk Music Group, then as President/CEO of the US division of the PolyGram International Publishing Group, and now as President/CEO of his own precedent setting venture, Lichelle Music Company. Prior to his involvement in publishing, he was a successful songwriter, having had hundreds of his compositions recorded - including "That's Life" by Frank Sinatra. Mr. Kay has been a member of the Board of Directors of ASCAP since 1989 and is Chairman of its New Technologies Committee. He is also on the Board of the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA).



The ASCAP Daily Brief-Powered by The Dean's List is intended as a guide to direct music professionals to key articles about issues facing the entertainment industry. Recipients are encouraged to read further about the issues by accessing the complete article through the links provided. Author attribution is provided with each article, and none of the links allow readers to by-pass subscription archive gateways. Please note that all editorial comments are indicated in brackets. Questions? Comments? Please Contact Us

ASCAP
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Tuesday, January 28, 2014

kdtn radio one february music add-ons

kdtn radio one february music add-ons

Neil Andrews

Neil Andrews

"Into The Night", NITE*SKY (co-songwriter: Lonnie Ratliff) ASCAP
Neil Andrews is an artist who sang with one of Melbourne, Australia's first Rock N Roll bands, "The Planets" in the early 60's performing alongside many of Australia's most famous Rock N Rollers.
During the 90's he turned his attention to Australian Country music making numerous appearances on TV in "Conway Country", "Country Gold", "The Phyllis Diller Celebrity Hour" and "The Danny La Rue" Australian Specials.
Neil's great love is writing and he has drawn on personal experience and a keen sense of observation to reflect the stories told in his six albums to date.
DJ's and fans delight in his lyrics and musical delivery, and you'll be sure to love this new song! We thank you in advance for giving Neil Andrews' music heavy airplay!
Email: neiland@ozemail.com.au
Website: www.neilandrewscountry.com
CD Baby: www.cdbaby.com/Artist/NeilAndrews
NITE*SKY Records International


Andrew Dean/CEO NITE*SKY International Records, Promotions and Artist Development, Email Andrew@nitesky.us
"Where the Stars Shine"
http://www.nitesky.us

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

ASCAP Daily Brief



ASCAP Daily Brief
Wednesday, January 22, 2014


We are pleased to offer you the
ASCAP Daily Brief powered by The Dean's List


This daily email, compiled by ASCAP Board member, music publisher and songwriter Dean Kay, cuts through the media clutter to bring you links to the most relevant news and commentary on the rapidly evolving music industry and how it affects your future livelihood. Now the ASCAP Daily Brief can be accessed on the Headlines page of ASCAP.com and in the ASCAP RSS Feed.


"Copyright theft is theft as in identity, not in car."
Richard Bennett - Visiting Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
Tech Policy Is Not A Religion
By Robert Atkinson -- "Digital libertarians" and "digital technocrats" want us to believe their way is the truth and the light. It's not that black and white.
[Long and wonky but essential reading for those who create Intellectual Property (music in our case), and those who appreciate the value human creativity brings to our lives.]
The 'Reason and Nature' of Intellectual Property: Copyright and Patent in The Federalist Papers (.pdf)
By Randolph J. May and Seth L. Cooper -- "A thoroughly primitive 18th Century utilitarian understanding of IP rights would regard them as a means to the greatest good for the greatest number according to some sort of calculation about collective human pleasure and pain responses. But a utilitarian understanding of human life, liberty or property devoid of any inherent sense of what is right, just or good, would have been foreign to those who framed and ratified the US Constitution."
Billboard's Stream & Digital Counts Begin Affecting Top 100 – What Does This Mean For The Future Of Charts, Music?
By Andy Lykens -- Bon Jovi jumped back in the top 100 a short while ago with their 1986 hit "Livin' On A Prayer." It was boosted to #25 thanks to a viral video of a fan dancing like a maniac at a basketball game combined with Billboard's recent inclusion of streams and downloads into it's chart-determining formula.
1992 – A New Home in Music City
By ASCAP100 -- After 30 years, ASCAP’s Nashville branch outgrows its initial headquarters. In order to accommodate the burgeoning country music business, the Society builds a new, state-of-the-art building in 1992, where it continues to reside and flourish today.
So Dr. Dre, Jimmy Iovine and Trent Reznor Walk Into a Bar...
By Andrew Orlowski -- Today finally sees the launch of the much-delayed and much-hyped anticipated Beats Music service in the USA.
REVIEW: Beats Music
By Brad Hill
Dotcom's Baboom Service Launches in NZ: 'Only Pay for Music If You like It'
By Chris Keall
How Vinyl Records Are Made
By Chris Higgins
Weekly Copyright Issues Wrap Up...January 17th, 2014
By The Copyright Alliance
Nashville's Music Row to See More Mixed-Use Projects
By Getahn Ward -- [Couple of things about this article 1. For we "old timers," the dissipation of the music business away from Music Row is sad. There was no better music vibe in the world than The Row in its heyday. And, 2. The smaller picture on the lower left side of this article is a head-on shot of the building Lawrence Welk built on Music Row while I was head of his publishing companies. Great writers, great staff, more fun than a barrel of hillbillies. Wait a minute, it was a barrel of hillbillies. Loved it.More here.]
Google Glass User Detained at the Movies over Piracy Fears
By Brian Fung -- Don't wear Google Glass to the movies if you actually want to see the movie.
Tavi Gevinson Rockets from Rookie to Teen Pop-Culture Heights
By Deborah Vankin -- High schooler and creator of online magazine Rookie, Tavi Gevinson is busy fashioning a DIY media empire that speaks to teens.
Amazon Knows What You Want Before You Do
By Mike Cassidy -- With the latest news from Amazon (via the Wall Street Journal), I'm convinced the day is coming that I'm going to wake up in a pair of pajamas that I never ordered and never knew I wanted...
The Best Sounding Plug-in In The World
By Russ Hughes -- ...modern plug-ins have virtually leveled the playing field and given all of us, irrespective of being rich or poor, access to great tools for use in our DAW.
Listen to All the Best Original Song Oscar Nominees
By Lindsey Weber




Dean KayDEAN KAY

Dean Kay has been at the helm of some of the most highly respected and forward thinking music publishing companies in the world, first as COO of the Welk Music Group, then as President/CEO of the US division of the PolyGram International Publishing Group, and now as President/CEO of his own precedent setting venture, Lichelle Music Company. Prior to his involvement in publishing, he was a successful songwriter, having had hundreds of his compositions recorded - including "That's Life" by Frank Sinatra. Mr. Kay has been a member of the Board of Directors of ASCAP since 1989 and is Chairman of its New Technologies Committee. He is also on the Board of the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA).



The ASCAP Daily Brief-Powered by The Dean's List is intended as a guide to direct music professionals to key articles about issues facing the entertainment industry. Recipients are encouraged to read further about the issues by accessing the complete article through the links provided. Author attribution is provided with each article, and none of the links allow readers to by-pass subscription archive gateways. Please note that all editorial comments are indicated in brackets. Questions? Comments? Please Contact Us

ASCAP
ASCAPNewsletter Preference Center | RSS | Unsubscribe | Contact ASCAP Daily Brief
Contact ASCAP Member Services | Terms of Use

© 2013 ASCAP   

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

ASCAP Daily Update



ASCAP Daily Brief
Tuesday, January 21, 2014


We are pleased to offer you the
ASCAP Daily Brief powered by The Dean's List


This daily email, compiled by ASCAP Board member, music publisher and songwriter Dean Kay, cuts through the media clutter to bring you links to the most relevant news and commentary on the rapidly evolving music industry and how it affects your future livelihood. Now the ASCAP Daily Brief can be accessed on the Headlines page of ASCAP.com and in the ASCAP RSS Feed.


"Copyright theft is theft as in identity, not in car."
Richard Bennett - Visiting Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
While Artists are Bitching About Spotify Royalties...Google, YouTube and Grooveshark are in the Getaway Car...
By The Trichordist
EFF Misses the Nuance of Digital Ownership
By Gordon Platt -- The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is adept at creating slogans or calls to action that over simplify without enlightening. The EFF's themed Copyright Week, which it has scheduled to mark the second anniversary of the SOPA Blackout protests, is no exception.
Why No One Cares About Your Music
By Ari Herstand -- All musicians are passionately, desperately and hopelessly in love with music. It's why we chose such a difficult career path. But, most people who are music fans and music reviewers, unfortunately, aren't as obsessed with the music itself...What am I getting at? If you're going to manage your music career then you have to understand who you are targeting and what sells.
1991 – Shut Up and Listen!
By ASCAP100 -- Our Quiet on the Set series has brought 400+ acts to the (attentive) masses over the years. The first Quiet on the Set took place on July 22nd, 1991 at Largo...
Vinyl Records Spin into Revival, Making a Mark in Music City Area
By Nate Rau -- The vinyl resurgence has made a mark on Middle Tennessee, where existing independent record stores are expanding, new stores are setting up shop and music fanatics are increasingly turning away digital options in favor of the physical medium that dominated retail music decades ago.
Radionomy Now Controls 'Half of All Streamed Internet Radio Worldwide'
By Nina Ulloa -- Radionomy is a platform for radio producers and broadcasters and provides a digital audio advertising network. They have added Shoutcast's 50,000 radio stations to their network, leaving them at a total of 60,000 stations.
Refrigerator Among Devices Hacked in Internet of Things Cyber Attack
By Salvador Rodriguez
[Sounds like they are starting to reach the demographic with money.]
Facebook's Social Ad Data Shows Less Teens, Less Students, More Sex, Less Drugs
By Clyde Smith
[Hopefully Siri only retrieves from legal sites.]
Get Song Lyrics with Siri from the iPhone or iPad
By OS X Daily -- Whether you're aiming for some spontaneous iPhone-based Karaoke, looking to settle a dispute over what an artist is saying, wanting to add some lyrics to a song that is missing them, or just wondering what the lyrics to a given song are, Siri doesn't care, anything goes.
These Tiny Speakers Pump Out Studio Sound on the Cheap
By Chris Jones -- JBL's LSR305 monitors are small desktop speakers that sound great no matter where you put them in your home. With built-in amps, these "active" speakers only require an outlet for power, and an output source for audio.
40 Thought Provoking Questions For Guitar Players
By Klaus Crow
VIDEO: Johnnyrandom | Bespoken
By Johnnyrandom -- Composer Johnnyrandom breaks new ground with musical compositions made exclusively from everyday objects. His debut single, "Bespoken," explores the full potential of sounds generated from bicycles and their components. [Thanks to Etan Rosenbloom for the link.]
15 'American Idol' Alumni Songs That Don't Suck
By Katy Kroll --After crying, clawing, crooning and sometimes caterwauling their way into the top 12, American Idol contestants face their toughest challenge – severing ties with the reality show behemoth and becoming successful musicians in the real world.




Dean KayDEAN KAY

Dean Kay has been at the helm of some of the most highly respected and forward thinking music publishing companies in the world, first as COO of the Welk Music Group, then as President/CEO of the US division of the PolyGram International Publishing Group, and now as President/CEO of his own precedent setting venture, Lichelle Music Company. Prior to his involvement in publishing, he was a successful songwriter, having had hundreds of his compositions recorded - including "That's Life" by Frank Sinatra. Mr. Kay has been a member of the Board of Directors of ASCAP since 1989 and is Chairman of its New Technologies Committee. He is also on the Board of the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA).



The ASCAP Daily Brief-Powered by The Dean's List is intended as a guide to direct music professionals to key articles about issues facing the entertainment industry. Recipients are encouraged to read further about the issues by accessing the complete article through the links provided. Author attribution is provided with each article, and none of the links allow readers to by-pass subscription archive gateways. Please note that all editorial comments are indicated in brackets. Questions? Comments? Please Contact Us

ASCAP
ASCAPNewsletter Preference Center | RSS | Unsubscribe | Contact ASCAP Daily Brief
Contact ASCAP Member Services | Terms of Use

© 2013 ASCAP   

Merrell Fankhauser and Captain Beefheart of the Antelope Valley days



COVER STORY: Merrell Fankhauser remembers Captain Beefheart and more The other week I was interviewing the ever fascinating Merrell Fankhauser about his forthcoming archive project, when our conversation wandered off onto more arcane subjects...

 Merrell: Yeah, the thing is, you know, the Captain, Don [van] Vliet, he’s passed away now, and the bass player from MU that was also in the Exiles - Larry Willey - he’s passed away so a lot of these guys aren’t even around anymore and I know they would just get the biggest kick out of hearing this stuff that we all just forgot about. I’d write three or four songs a week back then in the early sixties so we were recording them just one after another, you know, so I totally forgot about them. If I didn’t recognise my voice, you know, I wouldn’t even know that I’d written the song!

 Jon: Do you have any of them that actually have got the Captain on?

 Merrell: No. He and I jammed a lot together and we jammed in his house and jammed in Woodland Hills. See, the Exiles was formed before he formed Captain Beefheart. Frank Zappa and he went to high school together in Lancaster and then Frank moved down south, down to – ooh gosh, I can’t remember the name – it was southern California. And they still, you know, communicated and he helped him produce that Trout Mask Replica album and that was the last time I saw Frank, when we were all living in Woodland Hills and they recorded some of that in his house. Don Vliet would drive over and sit in his Jaguar outside of my garage and listen to the different musicians I had playing in the band as we were rehearsing and he’d have these guys go over and say “Who’s playing that guitar?” “Is Merrell singing on this?” [Jon laughs]

 Merrell: So he would go try to recruit my musicians and he got John French first and then much later on he got Jeff Cotton. And then I don’t know if you read the story that Nigel Cross wrote – it was in Bucketfull of Brains and some other UK fanzine thing – about how when we formed MU and we were living one canyon over in Woodland Hills and Jeff left the band and they were all very angry about it and they kidnapped him one day and held him in the Beefheart house, and I had to go over there and have like a four-and-a-half-hour battle of the brains with Don to get Jeff back and take him back home with me. [Jon laughs]

 Merrell: And it was really a strange scene, Jon. This has all been written about. I think it’s in the book too, you know. You’d go over there and Don and I were friends and we’d jam and stuff together. And some of it got recorded, to answer your question, on little tape recorders and stuff but who knows where any of that went? But I’d go over there once in a while to visit them – and this was before Jeff joined me – and John French would have a splint on his finger – a broken finger. And then the bass player, Mark Boston, would walk out and he had a bloody lip. [laughs] So the Captain would decide who’s fucking up the band and he’d have the rest of the members go beat that guy up! [Jon laughs]

 Merrell: Yeah.

 Jon: Jesus!

 Merrell: Yeah, and he painted the whole living room red because he said “That’s the only way I can keep these guys awake and alert, Merrell.” And so you never knew who was gonna be the bad guy. And what happened at one point, Jeff Cotton turned out to be the bad guy – this was when he left the band – and they beat him up so bad they broke a couple of ribs, and he had to go to the hospital so his parents got him and took him back up to Lancaster, and he was up there for a while recuperating. And Jeff wanted to join me and his parents were afraid to let him go back down there because they were afraid the Beefheart guys would get him. And so everything was fine, you know, for about five or six months and then they found him down at a music store. He had walked down the street from my house, and it was Bill Harkleroad and Mark Boston and John French, and they kidnapped him – literally grabbed him off the street and took him up to Beefheart’s house. And I found out where he went from the music store owner so I went up there to retrieve him, and the poor guy was slumped in this bathroom, in the bath tub, whimpering and crying. Don would have a way of psychoanalysing people, you know, and really make them feel worthless and at one point Jeff was saying “Don’s right,

Merrell: I gotta re-join his band.” And it took me a while to talk this out. I was in very good shape back then, Jon, and I’d been used to fighting [laughs] Mexicans in high school and those guys knew they couldn’t mess with me, you know, so I just grabbed Jeff and took him out of there. It reminded me of a book, The Devil and Daniel Webster, and several of the guys in the band, if you’ve read any of those books, they still harbour ill feelings against Don Vliet, you know. And a lot of them believed he was the devil. [Laughs] And Jeff Cotton still believes that Don was the devil.

 Jon: Good God.

 Merrell: And the girlfriend – I know I’m rambling on – the girlfriend –

 Jon: Carry on rambling; I’m enjoying this immensely.

 Merrell: The girlfriend, Lori – she would dose them with LSD in their hamburgers at night and so they would start coming onto this drug and not known that they’d been dosed, and they thought it was Don’s power; that he had some power, that he was doing this to them. And then he had Zappa put all of this portable recording equipment in the house and he had his cousin Victor, who ran it, and when these guys would get all high he would go “OK, tonight we’re going to play a strawberry,” and so you were supposed to imagine whatever a strawberry would sound like. [Laughs] And they’d all start playing and he’d say “it goes like this,” and he’d play these abstract notes on the piano. I’d been there when he was doing that. And he’d try to get the guitar players to play this melody that he was making up. That’s how some of that stuff was recorded: they were high on acid and they didn’t even know it.

 Jon: Good Lord!

 Merrell: [Laughs] It was sick. A lot of people said it reminded them of the Charles Manson deal but at least nobody was getting killed! [Laughs] People were getting beat up and severely psychologically damaged. And I think it still damaged Jeff because he won’t play music anymore. After MU moved to Maui he met this beautiful Hawaiian/Chinese girl who was a Christian, he then all of a sudden believed that the music, and the music business in particular, was the devil’s work. 

Jon: Good God!

 Merrell: Yeah. It’s a shame because he’s a talented guy and you know, he was my guitar student at age fourteen when I met him. Jon: It’s interesting you said that people – ‘cause I thought that what you were saying about the way that Don did this sort of psychic mind control of his –

 Merrell: Yeah.

 Jon: I was thinking that sounded very Charles Manson.

 Merrell: Yeah. Very much so. Jon: And of course they were both in the desert at roughly the same sort of time, weren’t they? Merrell: Well, let’s see. No, Manson went up in the desert later. The odd thing about that, if you read my book, when we formed MU Randy had a house on the outskirts of Los Angeles that went into this like deserty area, where there was this Spahn movie ranch, where the Mason gang was living and you can see this ranch, Jon. It’s in old late-1940s and early-fifties movies. A cowboy’ll ride by this rock with some Indians chasing him and that’s right on the outskirts of L.A. Well, Randy ran into two of the Mason girls once when he was hiking in this stream, and that’s in my book. Manson then fled out to the desert when he did those murders so that was later that Manson lived in the desert but yeah, they did both end up out in the desert. Don Vliet later moved way up to northern California and bought an old boy-scout camp, and that’s where he tried to keep the band going and then he ended up getting M.S. and died. He was a creative guy but he was just, I would say, the ultimate control freak. He could definitely captivate an audience just by talking and he had this scary air about him that reminded me of Lon Chaney Jr that played the wolf man in the werewolf movie.

 Jon: Oh, yeah, I know him.

 Merrell: In a way. People were – they were afraid of him. I could see how they would be afraid of him. When I had this battle of the brains with him, with Jeff Cotton stuck in the bath tub, he had a screen cage and he would catch these various spiders in the house, and sometimes a black widow and he would put them in this cage and watch them fight. And one time he said to me, Jon, when we were talking and he goes “Isnt’ that heavy? What would you think if I could make one of those spiders smoke a cigarette?” I said, “Well, that’d be a good trick, Don.” But, yeah, he was really something. He could’ve been a great actor, I think. He really had that way of commanding an audience. Jon: I so wish that the tape recordings of you two jamming hadn’t got lost.

 Merrell: Yeah. You know there was just so much bizarre stuff going on and bizarre behaviour. I am playing bottleneck slide on ‘China Pig’,– if it’s the same take ?– I think they gave the credit to Doug Moon on that because they didn’t know who had played that. But I listened to all of those recordings to see if I was on anything and several people thought it was me playing slide on this song called ‘China pig.’

 Jon: Oh, that’s fantastic.

 Merrell: Yeah. I’m on a few Spirit songs too that Mick Skidmore had something to do with putting out and they didn’t give me credit for playing on that either. I played slide and bass and acoustic twelve-string on a couple of songs that were on that. I think Evangeline label; California Blues; one of the last Spirit albums that came out.

 Jon: Good Lord.

 Merrell: Yeah. Jon: I’ll tell you one thing that surprised me as well, when you were just talking about Manson, I didn’t realise that Spahn ranch was right on the outskirts of Los Angeles; I’d always assumed it was right back, deep in the desert somewhere.

Merrell: No, it wasn’t, Jon. It was out, actually just past Woodland Hills in Chatsworth. Woodland Hills is where I lived and I’d moved there with HMS Bounty, and Beefheart had moved down from the desert and he lived just one canyon over. And we bumped into each other at the music store, and he’d say “Oh, come on up and jam,” and he’d come over to my house and jam once in a while. Chatsworth was going just sort of towards the desert foothills and it was just out of the San Fernando Valley, actually. They used those areas a lot for cowboy movies and stuff because it looked very rugged. There was a lot of interesting rock formations, things like that. Jon: Oh, that changes my whole sort of mental picture.

 Merrell: Yeah. Jon: Because I’d assumed it was miles away.

 Merrell: No, he ran off to the desert after he had murdered all those people and he was afraid that they were gonna find him there. Dennis Wilson, the drummer of the Beach Boys, met him, and went up there and hung out with him, and was even trying to help record some of Charles Manson’s songs. They weren’t very good but somehow he got interested in them. Jon: I’m glad you’Jon I corrected a few wrong words and repeats in a few sections, it flows nicely now. If you copy and paste it as Ive corrected it then you can use it. Let me know when its online? Please let me know you've been getting all the photos Ive been sending for the book ? There are more coming. Best Always, Merrell say that because I’ve heard them and I didn’t think they were any good either. Merrell: Yeah. Jon: But you know, I don’t know what it was about them that people – ‘cause Neil Young thought he was a very good song writer but I always thought they were terrible.

 Merrell: Yeah, yeah. Most of the people I knew too didn’t think they were very good. I mean, I think Dennis Wilson is probably lucky he didn’t get murdered because Charles Manson got mad and upset because he couldn’t get a record deal. Jon: Golly! Merrell: Yeah! Jon: Was he a sort of fixture on the outskirts of the music scene, then? Merrell: Well, I guess he was trying to break in any way he could and Terry Melcher, I know, had met him and he was trying to get Terry Melcher to get him a deal, and when he couldn’t do that, and Terry Melcher and lived in that house where he had – Jon: Cielo drive Merrell: Yeah, and so I think he thought he was getting back at Terry Melcher when he killed all of those people and Sharon Tate. Jon: Wow.

 Merrell: Yeah. Yeah, that was a very strange time and the odd thing was we were watching TV, Randy Weimer the drummer from MU, and I, and they announced this thing: that they’d zeroed in on these people from Spahn Ranch, that they thought had something to do with the murders, and they mentioned Charles Manson because he was on probation or something, and Randy went “Oh, my God! Those two girls I met up the creek when I was hiking were two of Charles Manson’s girls!” And he just realised that and figured it out when we got this news over the television.

Friday, January 17, 2014

ASCAP Daily



ASCAP Daily Brief
Friday, January 17, 2014


We are pleased to offer you the
ASCAP Daily Brief powered by The Dean's List


This daily email, compiled by ASCAP Board member, music publisher and songwriter Dean Kay, cuts through the media clutter to bring you links to the most relevant news and commentary on the rapidly evolving music industry and how it affects your future livelihood. Now the ASCAP Daily Brief can be accessed on the Headlines page of ASCAP.com and in the ASCAP RSS Feed.


"Copyright theft is theft as in identity, not in car."
Richard Bennett - Visiting Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
The Siren Song of Efficiency in Music Licensing
By Bartlett D. Cleland -- Yes, music licensing could be more efficient, and the music industry sees the potential for greater value if it were, which should lead to greater efficiency. However, creating some new fair use exception to intellectual property protection is not the answer. As in every other area of the economy, it is markets that will lead to greater efficiency in music licensing, but weakening property rights will destroy those same markets.
12 Days of Music Monetization
By Ariel Hyatt -- I reached out to some of my favorite colleagues in the music business and asked them to contribute an article that talks about "making money from your music." I left it fairly open and their responses are FANTASTIC! Here is a list of the topics and each one is a full-length article...
If You Thought Spotify Had Free Listening Before, Well, Now It's Extra Free
By Brad Hill -- Today, Spotify makes news by revealing a restriction most people didn't know about, then lifting it.
FCC Shelves Pandora's Bid For South Dakota Radio Station
By Ed Christman -- Pandora has received word from the FCC that it is no longer processing its application for the transfer of the ownership of broadcasting license for KXMZ, the Rapid City, SD radio station it acquired last June.
1987 – Horne of Plenty
By ASCAP100 -- Lena Horne is added to the distinguished list of ASCAP Pied Piper Award recipients, in recognition of her 50 years as an actress, recording artist and performer...
Smartphones Get More Sophisticated; Their Owners Don't
By Michael S. Rosenwald -- For many, the features of their fancy phones go unused because they're too confusing or intimidating.
How Technology Killed the Future
By Douglas Rushkoff -- Sure, the rate at which information spreads and multiplies has accelerated, but what's taking place now is more than a mere speeding up. What we're experiencing is the amplification of everything that happens to be occurring at the moment, and a diminishment of everything that isn't. It's not just that Google search results favor the recent over the relevant; it's that suddenly an entire society does. [Thanks to Neil Turkewitz for the link.]
The Deal Is Final: Winamp and ShoutCast to Radionomy
By Brad Hill -- Radionomy has acquired ShoutCast and Winamp from AOL...AOL's divestment of the two Nullsoft assets extends a general exit from music-related content businesses...
What CES 2014 Meant For Music Lovers
By Amy Taylor -- The hot theme at this year's show was integrating music into other devices that are not strictly music players...
3D-Printed Music Box Plays Customer-Composed Songs
By Lara Piras -- Music Drop, is a modern take on the hand-cranked music box and demonstrates the opportunities that 3D-printing presents for custom manufacturing.
AirTurn Introduces TAP – the Digital Page Turner for Drummers
By PRWEB -- Mounted on a hi-hat or microphone stand, TAP can advance digital sheet music pages and trigger events such as backing tracks, metronomes or several other functions within a wide range of compatible apps.
Learn About a New Music Genre Every Day
By Paul Lamere -- The Echo Nest knows about 800 genres of music (and that number is growing all the time). Among those 800 genres are ones that you already know about...But there are also hundreds of genres that you've probably never heard of. Genres like Filthstep, Dangdut or Skweee.




Dean KayDEAN KAY

Dean Kay has been at the helm of some of the most highly respected and forward thinking music publishing companies in the world, first as COO of the Welk Music Group, then as President/CEO of the US division of the PolyGram International Publishing Group, and now as President/CEO of his own precedent setting venture, Lichelle Music Company. Prior to his involvement in publishing, he was a successful songwriter, having had hundreds of his compositions recorded - including "That's Life" by Frank Sinatra. Mr. Kay has been a member of the Board of Directors of ASCAP since 1989 and is Chairman of its New Technologies Committee. He is also on the Board of the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA).



The ASCAP Daily Brief-Powered by The Dean's List is intended as a guide to direct music professionals to key articles about issues facing the entertainment industry. Recipients are encouraged to read further about the issues by accessing the complete article through the links provided. Author attribution is provided with each article, and none of the links allow readers to by-pass subscription archive gateways. Please note that all editorial comments are indicated in brackets. Questions? Comments? Please Contact Us

ASCAP
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Thursday, January 16, 2014

ASCAP Daily



ASCAP Daily Brief
Thursday, January 16, 2014


We are pleased to offer you the
ASCAP Daily Brief powered by The Dean's List


This daily email, compiled by ASCAP Board member, music publisher and songwriter Dean Kay, cuts through the media clutter to bring you links to the most relevant news and commentary on the rapidly evolving music industry and how it affects your future livelihood. Now the ASCAP Daily Brief can be accessed on the Headlines page of ASCAP.com and in the ASCAP RSS Feed.


"Copyright theft is theft as in identity, not in car."
Richard Bennett - Visiting Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
Don Henley Talks Google Versus Musicians
By The Trichordist -- "In the technocratic world of Google (which owns YouTube), my musical brethren and I are no longer artists; we're not creators — we are merely "content providers"...
VIDEO: Publishing Rights Victory
By TouchVision -- Youtube multichannel, Fullscreen, is deleting all videos with unlicensed music from its creators' channels. The company settled a copyright infringement lawsuit with the National Music Publishers' Association.
1986 – Morton Gould Elected ASCAP President
By ASCAP100 -- Morton Gould, the sought-after composer of classical music, musicals and ballets, is elected President of ASCAP in 1986. During his eight years as President, he guided ASCAP through the early years of the advent of the internet...
Shazam and SoundHound Take from Radio and Give to Streaming
By Brad Hill -- Shazam and SoundHound were founded on the idea of real-world music recognition, but recently have increasingly added features that close the circle back into listening services. They act as on-ramps to streaming music.
Pandora Adds Recommendations, Pushing Stock Even Higher
By Brad Hill -- Today Pandora announced the addition of personalized recommendations in its iOS and Android mobile apps. Whether that justifies a stock spike is arguable, but the new feature does help solve a usability problem for Pandora, and could increase listener hours while retaining active users — two of Pandora's key metrics.
Google Can Buy Nest, But It Can't Buy Our Trust
By Dan Hon -- Google — whose self-described mission is to organize all the world's information — just bought Nest with $3.2 billion cash. On the surface, they're getting a four-year-old company that makes smart thermostats and smoke alarms. But when you probe deeper, you realize they're actually getting much more.
Secretive Apple Squirms in Gaze of U.S. Monitor
By Matthew Goldstein -- An inspector appointed by a federal judge to make sure that Apple complies with antitrust laws has drawn strong objections from the company, which says he is intruding on operations.
Apple Will Refund at Least $32.5M in App Case
By Jennifer C. Kerr -- Apple will refund at least $32.5 million to consumers to settle a federal case involving purchases that kids made without their parents' permission while playing on mobile apps...
[Free eBook] Building Your Website: A Step-By-Step Guide for Bands & Musicians
By Dave Cool -- If you're building a new website or simply looking to improve your current one, "Building Your Website: A Step-By-Step Guide for Bands and Musicians" aims to help all musicians make an effective website for their music.
The Rejection Letters That Burned Everyone From George Orwell to Aspiring Clowns
By Angela Watercutter -- Even great writers like George Orwell suffered setbacks, like when his novel Animal Farm was rejected as a "stupid and pointless fable" by Knopf Publishers in 1945.
We Interviewed the Founder of Yeezianity, the First Religion Based on Kanye West
By Eric Sundermann -- It's no secret that Kanye West sees himself as a god, so I guess it was just a matter of time until a religion formed around him. Enter the best religion of all time: Yeezianity.




Dean KayDEAN KAY

Dean Kay has been at the helm of some of the most highly respected and forward thinking music publishing companies in the world, first as COO of the Welk Music Group, then as President/CEO of the US division of the PolyGram International Publishing Group, and now as President/CEO of his own precedent setting venture, Lichelle Music Company. Prior to his involvement in publishing, he was a successful songwriter, having had hundreds of his compositions recorded - including "That's Life" by Frank Sinatra. Mr. Kay has been a member of the Board of Directors of ASCAP since 1989 and is Chairman of its New Technologies Committee. He is also on the Board of the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA).



The ASCAP Daily Brief-Powered by The Dean's List is intended as a guide to direct music professionals to key articles about issues facing the entertainment industry. Recipients are encouraged to read further about the issues by accessing the complete article through the links provided. Author attribution is provided with each article, and none of the links allow readers to by-pass subscription archive gateways. Please note that all editorial comments are indicated in brackets. Questions? Comments? Please Contact Us

ASCAP
ASCAPNewsletter Preference Center | RSS | Unsubscribe | Contact ASCAP Daily Brief
Contact ASCAP Member Services | Terms of Use

© 2013 ASCAP